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Binghamton Speech & Debate

Proposition: Emme Davis (Waterman Elementary School) vs. Opposition: Tabby Byron (Unaffiliated)

Judge: Kathryn Rubino (U.S. Military Academy)

Resolution: Finals Week: Kids should get to set their own bedtimes.

  • Emme Davis
    Emme Davis
    vs.



    Tabby Byron
    Tabby Byron
    Click to begin

    Speech Details

    Click on the other tabs to watch watch that speech.

    Posted at May 25, 2020 12:45:33PM EST by Emme Davis

    Citations

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    Catlin Tucker, June 21,2019
    (Educational Specialist, "Using Computers in the Classroom: Shifting from Consumption to Creation", https://catlintucker.com/2019/06/shifting-from-consumption-to-creation/)

    https://www.technologyreview.com/2019/12/19/131155/classroom-technology-holding-students-back-edtech-kids-education/

    Posted at May 26, 2020 06:19:46PM EST by Tabby Byron

    Citations

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    https://catlintucker.com/doctoral-work/

    https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1157

    Wurst, C., Smarkola C., & Gaffney, M. A. (2008). Ubiquitous laptop usage in higher education: Effects on student achievement, student satisfaction, and constructivist measures in honors and traditional classrooms. Computers & Education, 51, 1766-1783.

    Anderson, R. J., Anderson, R., Vandegrift, T., Wolfman, S., & Yasuhara, K. (2003). Promoting interaction in large classes with computer-mediated feedback. In B. Wasson, S. Ludvigsen, & U. Hoppe (Eds.), Designing for Change in Networked Learning Environments: Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning (pp. 119-123). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Samson, P. J. (2010). Deliberate engagement of laptops in large lecture classes to improve attentiveness and engagement. Computers in Education Journal, 20(2), 22-37.

    Caron, P., & Gely, R. (2004). Taking back the law school classroom: Using technology to foster active student learning. Journal of Legal Education, 54, 551-569.

    Posted at May 27, 2020 09:00:57PM EST by Emme Davis

    Citations

    Show

    https://catlintucker.com/doctoral-work/

    https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1157

    https://www.technologyreview.com/2019/12/19/131155/classroom-technology-holding-students-back-edtech-kids-education/

    http://www.annarbor.com/business-review/university-of-michigan-startup-lecturetools-introduces-software-allowing-professors-to-embrace-smart/

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042813037658

    https://www.theedadvocate.org/cheating-and-technology-unethical-indifference/



    Posted at May 28, 2020 07:41:56PM EST by Tabby Byron

    Citations

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    https://soe.umich.edu/rooms-floor-plans/classrooms

    https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1157

    Wurst, C., Smarkola C., & Gaffney, M. A. (2008). Ubiquitous laptop usage in higher education: Effects on student achievement, student satisfaction, and constructivist measures in honors and traditional classrooms. Computers & Education, 51, 1766-1783.

    Anderson, R. J., Anderson, R., Vandegrift, T., Wolfman, S., & Yasuhara, K. (2003). Promoting interaction in large classes with computer-mediated feedback. In B. Wasson, S. Ludvigsen, & U. Hoppe (Eds.), Designing for Change in Networked Learning Environments: Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning (pp. 119-123). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Samson, P. J. (2010). Deliberate engagement of laptops in large lecture classes to improve attentiveness and engagement. Computers in Education Journal, 20(2), 22-37.

    Caron, P., & Gely, R. (2004). Taking back the law school classroom: Using technology to foster active student learning. Journal of Legal Education, 54, 551-569.

    Posted at May 29, 2020 12:53:17PM EST by Emme Davis

    Citations

    Show

    https://www.technologyreview.com/2019/12/19/131155/classroom-technology-holding-students-back-edtech-kids-education/

    https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1157

    http://www.annarbor.com/business-review/university-of-michigan-startup-lecturetools-introduces-software-allowing-professors-to-embrace-smart/

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042813037658

    https://www.theedadvocate.org/cheating-and-technology-unethical-indifference/

    Status

    This match has been completed. Show the Decision.

    Submitted at May 30, 2020 09:18:13PM EST by Kathryn Rubino

    Category Emme Davis Tabby Byron
    Use of evidence: 5.5 5.2
    Delivery skill: 5.3 5.1
    Coherence of arguments: 5 4.5
    Responsiveness to opponent: 5.8 5.5
    Identification of key points: 5.5 5
    Comments: Great job Emme! I like how you made comparisons between the type of evidence you were using and the evidence of your opponent. Being able to create those distinctions is really important.

    Something to work on is, in your final rebuttal, framing how you want the judge to evaluate the debate round. If you go a level deeper than just listing your impacts but explaining why your impacts should matter more to the judge you'll have an even greater advantage particularly in close rounds.

    For example, how does the harm of distracted students weigh against the anxious/meek students your opponent brings up that may only be empowered to ask questions because of technology?
    Great job! You were really stellar at responding to Emme and researching great points about why computers in the university setting can be good.

    Some stuff to work on -- it's a little challenging trying to match up your sources with the arguments in your speech, particularly when you list extra sources that you do not use within the time limits of your speech. Also, while you point out a few good points about computers in colleges, you need to work on weighing what those benefits are against the bad things your opponent claims in her speech.

    For example if you win that laptops are good in colleges, but your opponent wins that it isn't good for younger students how do you want the judge to evaluate those different impacts?

    The decision is for the Proposition: Emme Davis

    Reason for Decision:

    Wonderful debate. Ultimately I decide that the disadvantages to laptops in the classroom outweigh the potential good. Emme does a nice job limiting the scope of the benefits of laptops that Tabby brings up (like that the studies are limited to universities and that they mostly measure student satisfaction not achievement, and that technology companies' self-interest in educational tech is widespread) while still winning the harms of laptops (like distracted students, hurting student achievement, and cheating). Additionally, any potential benefits of laptops are isolated to higher education, while the downsides are broader and more widespread.


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