Skip header content and main navigation Binghamton University, State University of New York - Patrick
Banner Brandon Evans Brittney Bleyle Trevor Reddick Phillip George Sonya Robinson Maneo Choudhury Daniel Friedman Joe Leeson-Schatz Anna Pinchuk Masakazu Kurihara Joshua Frumkin

Binghamton Speech & Debate

Proposition: matthew Derlly (Unaffiliated) vs. Opposition: Danielle Roman (Binghamton University)

Judge: Carlos Varela (University of Vermont)

Resolution: Resolved: This house believes that being a vegetarian is a better ethical choice than meat eating.

  • matthew Derlly
    matthew Derlly
    vs.



    Danielle Roman
    Danielle Roman
    Click to begin

    Speech Details

    Click on the other tabs to watch watch that speech.

    Posted at October 13, 2014 08:32:29PM EST by matthew Derlly

    Citations

    Show

    None available for this speech.

    Posted at October 15, 2014 01:21:58AM EST by Danielle Roman

    Citations

    Show

    "Eat More Chicken, Fish and Beans than Red Meat." Eat More Chicken, Fish and Beans than Red Meat. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014. <http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/Eat-More-Chicken-Fish-and-Beans-than-Red-Meat_UCM_320278_Article.jsp>.

    "Healthy Choices - Chicken.ca." Chicken.ca. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014. <http://www.chicken.ca/health/view/2/white-meat-vs-dark-meat>.

    "The Benefits of Eating Fish." Seafood Selector. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014. <http://seafood.edf.org/benefits-eating-fish>.

    "Sorry, Vegans: Eating Meat and Cooking Food Is How Humans Got Their Big Brains." Washington Post. The Washington Post, n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014. <http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/sorry-vegans-eating-meat-and-cooking-food-is-how-humans-got-their-big-brains/2012/11/26/3d4d36de-326d-11e2-bb9b-288a310849ee_story.html>.

    "Chickopedia: What Consumers Need to Know - The National Chicken Council." The National Chicken Council. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Oct. 2014. <http://www.nationalchickencouncil.org/about-the-industry/chickopedia/>.

    Posted at October 15, 2014 07:22:45PM EST by matthew Derlly

    Citations

    Show

    None available for this speech.

    Posted at October 16, 2014 10:01:26PM EST by Danielle Roman

    Citations

    Show

    "Causes and Consequences." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Apr. 2012. Web. 16 Oct. 2014. <http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/adult/causes/index.html>.

    The American Diet in One Chart, with Lots of Fats and Sugars." Grist. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2014. <http://grist.org/industrial-agriculture/2011-04-05-american-diet-one-chart-lots-of-fats-sugars/>.

    "Vitamin B12 Deficiency: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2014. <http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/guide/vitamin-b12-deficiency-symptoms-causes>.

    Posted at October 17, 2014 06:01:36PM EST by matthew Derlly

    Citations

    Show

    None available for this speech.

    Status

    This match has been completed. Show the Decision.

    Submitted at October 20, 2014 10:47:28PM EST by Carlos Varela

    Category matthew Derlly Danielle Roman
    Use of evidence: 2.2 3.5
    Delivery skill: 3.2 4
    Coherence of arguments: 2.4 3.2
    Responsiveness to opponent: 2.4 3.3
    Identification of key points: 2.5 3.7
    Comments: The structure of the debate, the way you structure it coming out of the Proposition Constructive, is mostly centered around obesity and health argument.

    It was clever of you to conveniently define vegetarianism as including milk and eggs to enhance your health claims.

    The problem is that, your strategy also happens to be the most controversial one. Sure, health and obesity has been linked to a non vegetarian diet, but think of how many sources are available saying that meat can be part of a healthy diet.

    I instead suggest that your stategy include health and obesity, but then have another two arguments as well. So that if you lose the health/obesity debate, you still have another leg to stand on. I.e., environmental implications, runoff, social problems with the meat industry workers, world hunger, water shortage, animal rights, killing animals is not ethical since we can live without meat etcetc...
    Good job in diluting his claims that meat is the cause of obesity.

    Great job all around, solid performance through out the debate.

    One place to improve on is where your opponent defined vegetarianism as including milk and eggs. By conceding that definition, he gains ground in the debate. Instead, distinguish between a vegetarian and ova-lacto vegetarians. By forcing the proposition team to defend not eating milk and eggs, they are more limited in their argumentation and become susceptible to your arguments i.e. vitamin B12 deficiency in vegetarian diet.

    The decision is for the Opposition: Danielle Roman

    Reason for Decision:

    At the end of the debate, I am forced to believe that meat is only one of many factors that contribute to obesity and other factors such as exercise, genes, processed foods. As the judge, I am convinced based on this debate that more important than what we eat is how we eat, and eating some animal products in moderation is healthiest option. Since both sides were in agreement that health and obesity was the only issue at hand, I am led to believe that meat in moderation is the most ethical choice.


    Add Comment

    Please Create an Account or Log-In to post comments.

    Connect with Binghamton:
    Twitter icon links to Binghamton University's Twitter page YouTube icon links to Binghamton University's YouTube page Facebook icon links to Binghamton University's Facebook page Pinterest icon links to Binghamton University's Pinterest page

    Binghamton University Online Debate Platform powered by:

    PHP MySQL SUIT