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Binghamton Speech & Debate

Proposition: Kanupriya Pandey (Binghamton University) vs. Opposition: Andrew Seo (San Diego Forensics)

Judge: Trevor Reddick (Baylor University)

Resolution: Resolved: The United States Federal Government ought to pay reparations to African Americans.

  • Kanupriya Pandey
    Kanupriya Pandey
    vs.



    Andrew Seo
    Andrew Seo
    Click to begin

    Speech Details

    Click on the other tabs to watch watch that speech.

    Posted at October 12, 2015 09:41:06PM EST by Kanupriya Pandey

    Citations

    Show

    http://www.nea.org/home/15215.htm

    https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=16

    http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5299

    http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-justice-fact-sheet


    http://www.blackenterprise.com/small-business/african-american-buying-power-projected-trillions/

    The Journal of African American History, Vol. 97, No. 12, Special Issue: African Americans and Movements for Reparations: Past, Present, and Future (WinterSpring 2012), pp. 1-12
    Published by: Association for the Study of African American Life and History

    Harvard Law Review, 2002, JSTOR
    Bridging the Color Line: The Power of African-American Reparations to Redirect America's Future

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is an African-American writer at The Atlantic, as well as the author of two books, The Beautiful Struggle and Between the World and Me.

    Max Du Plessis, 2003, Historical Injustice and International Law: An Exploratory Discussion of Reparation for Slavery, https://muse-jhu-edu.proxy.binghamton.edu/journals/human_rights_quarterly/v025/25.3du_plessis.html#top


    Posted at October 13, 2015 03:17:44PM EST by Andrew Seo

    Citations

    Show

    None available for this speech.

    Posted at October 14, 2015 08:32:21PM EST by Kanupriya Pandey

    Citations

    Show

    http://www.nea.org/home/15215.htm

    https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=16

    http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5299

    http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-justice-fact-sheet


    http://www.blackenterprise.com/small-business/african-american-buying-power-projected-trillions/

    The Journal of African American History, Vol. 97, No. 12, Special Issue: African Americans and Movements for Reparations: Past, Present, and Future (WinterSpring 2012), pp. 1-12
    Published by: Association for the Study of African American Life and History

    Harvard Law Review, 2002, JSTOR
    Bridging the Color Line: The Power of African-American Reparations to Redirect America's Future

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is an African-American writer at The Atlantic, as well as the author of two books, The Beautiful Struggle and Between the World and Me.

    Max Du Plessis, 2003, Historical Injustice and International Law: An Exploratory Discussion of Reparation for Slavery, https://muse-jhu-edu.proxy.binghamton.edu/journals/human_rights_quarterly/v025/25.3du_plessis.html#top


    Martha Biondi is assistant professor in the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University and author of To Stand and Fight: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Postwar New York City (2003).

    Posted at October 16, 2015 02:37:16AM EST by Andrew Seo

    Citations

    Show

    None available for this speech.

    Posted at October 16, 2015 11:12:14PM EST by Kanupriya Pandey

    Citations

    Show

    http://www.nea.org/home/15215.htm

    https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=16

    http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5299

    http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-justice-fact-sheet


    http://www.blackenterprise.com/small-business/african-american-buying-power-projected-trillions/

    The Journal of African American History, Vol. 97, No. 12, Special Issue: African Americans and Movements for Reparations: Past, Present, and Future (WinterSpring 2012), pp. 1-12
    Published by: Association for the Study of African American Life and History

    Harvard Law Review, 2002, JSTOR
    Bridging the Color Line: The Power of African-American Reparations to Redirect America's Future

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is an African-American writer at The Atlantic, as well as the author of two books, The Beautiful Struggle and Between the World and Me.

    Max Du Plessis, 2003, Historical Injustice and International Law: An Exploratory Discussion of Reparation for Slavery, https://muse-jhu-edu.proxy.binghamton.edu/journals/human_rights_quarterly/v025/25.3du_plessis.html#top


    Martha Biondi is assistant professor in the Department of African American Studies at Northwestern University and author of To Stand and Fight: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Postwar New York City (2003).


    http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2010/summer/slave-pension.html

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/01/13/whos-poor-in-america-50-years-into-the-war-on-poverty-a-data-portrait/

    Status

    This match has been completed. Show the Decision.

    Submitted at October 18, 2015 12:53:03AM EST by Trevor Reddick

    Category Kanupriya Pandey Andrew Seo
    Use of evidence: 5 4.7
    Delivery skill: 5 4.7
    Coherence of arguments: 5 4.6
    Responsiveness to opponent: 5 4.6
    Identification of key points: 4.5 4.6
    Comments: You did a very good job, and I don't know if you're on the debate team currently but I would highly recommend you contact Joe Leeson-Schatz at debate@binghamton.edu and consider joining. I found you to be very articulate, intelligent, and a pleasure to listen to. That being said, I think that your last speech was weak on the important points and light on analysis but heavy on blippy extensions. Collapsing to comparison and explanation would have behooved you in this debate. Also, the evidence on the economy you reference in your last speech is just simply not about the economic effects of reparations today. There's plenty of good evidence out there, you should find it. Need to collapse to your impacts quicker, have a better comparative analysis, and to be honest the moment when you exclaimed "so what?" came off very condescending and potentially offensive, so make sure to be careful with how you articulate arguments. Develop your own arguments for why hers is a bad argument, don't rely on non-sequitors. Nonetheless, you were awesome man, keep up the good work, and i think you have a bright future in debate!!

    The decision is for the Proposition: Kanupriya Pandey

    Reason for Decision:

    I don't have a coherent impact or framing by the con in this debate so I vote for the pro. I think both teams lack comparison, but I think that the arguments about purchasing power and economic investment are there in the proposition rebuttal, and are extended in the last speech. I think it link turns the economic arguments, and the other arguments are defensive at best, the con should have just collapsed to arguing about how economic collapse would happen before investment, how it would cause a larger issue so the pro would have to explain why it's justified to let the whole world burn, etc. It just doesn't happen here and I'm forced to defer this way. Good luck to you both, and I hope you continue to pursue debate, as you are both excellent!


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